Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: Select Cache Location in LST Server

  1. #1
    Newb
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    2
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Select Cache Location in LST Server

    I am currently testing throughput between systems that have both physical and iSCSI volumes. I am trying to compare the performance difference when reading/writing data between the different types of disk.

    It looks like the read/write file(s) are cached on the C:\ drive by default. Can I change this? I am using LST with LST Server.

  2. #2
    Home Network Guru
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    119
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    Hi,

    If you are trying to test the speed of your drives, you're not using LST Server are you? LST Server takes the drives out of the picture and allows network testing using just RAM of both machines. Otherwise, yes there are two ways to turn off the cache on your C: drive. One is to select 'Bypass drive's write caching when testing to a folder' and the other way is from Windows Device Manager - select your drive, right click and choose properties, go to the Policies tab, and uncheck 'Enable write caching on the disk'. Remember, by doing it from your Device Manager, this will affect your normal windows operations considerably if you forget to turn this back on

    -Pete

  3. #3
    Newb
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    2
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Thanks for the reply. I wasn't aware that LST Server wrote the test data to RAM. I simply assumed it was reading/writing to a file on disk somewhere, and I must have misinterpreted some of my other data as well. I'll have to rethink my test environment a bit.

    Also, I noticed that when using the "file share" method of testing with LST, performance isn't anywhere near what I get when simply doing a "drag-n-drop" file copy. Any thoughts on why this might be?

  4. #4
    Home Network Guru
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    119
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    The performance should be at least as good as windows 'Drag-n-Drop' file copy. The Windows 'Drag-n-Drop' file copy however, will always file cache after the first copy in either direction. All timings after the initial file copy are skewed by the file cache and the only way to stop the cache is by re-starting the computer. That's the benefit of LAN Speed Test. It clears out that file cache before every transfer when testing to a shared folder. No more re-starting the computer between every file copy when timing for speed tests.

    -Pete

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •